Car Accident Statistics

  • Car Accident Attorney in Miami Car accidents in Miami, Florida are a significant cause of personal injury and death each year.
  • Miami, Fl car accident lawyers file hundreds of lawsuits for personal injury and/or wrongful death each year.
  • There were 42,582 automobile accidents in Miami-Dade County, Florida in 2006.
  • More than 6.3 million auto accidents occurred in the United States in 2003. Almost one-third of these accidents resulted in an injury, with less than 1 percent of total crashes (38,252) resulting in a death.
  • 31,030 people were injured in Miami car accidents in 2006.
  • In 2005, 37,879 people were injured in Miami-Dade County car accidents.
  • There were 1,792 alcohol related auto accidents in Miami Dade County in 2006.
  • There were over 4.3 million highway car accidents in the U.S. in 2006 and 17,800 passenger car occupant fatalities
  • 347 people were killed in Miami, Fl. car accidents in 2006.
  • Midnight to 3 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays were the deadliest 3 hour periods throughout 2003 for car accidents.

  • More than half of the fatal automobile accidents in 2003 occurred on roads with posted speed limits of 55 mph or more, while only 25 percent of property-damage-only car accidents occurred on those roads.

  • Collisions with another motor vehicle in transport were the most common first harmful events for fatal, injury, and property-damage-only crashes in 2003. Collisions with fixed objects and non-collisions (eg. vehicle rollovers) accounted for only 19 percent of all accidents, but they accounted for 44 percent of fatal car accidents. [Based on 2003 data].

  • Forty percent of fatal car accidents involved alcohol. For fatal automobile accidents occurring from midnight to 3 a.m., 77 percent involved alcohol. [Based on 2003 data].

  • Nearly 95 percent of the 11 million vehicles involved in car accidents in 2003 were passenger cars or light trucks. [Based on 2003 data].

  • Compared with other vehicle types, utility vehicles experienced the highest rollover rates: 35.7 percent in fatal automobile accidents, 10.3 percent in injury crashes, and 2.8 percent in property-damage-only crashes. [Based on 2003 data]

  • Fires occurred in 0.1 percent of the vehicles involved in all car accidents in 2003. For fatal car accidents, however, fires occurred in nearly 3 percent of the vehicles involved.

  • Regardless of crash severity, the majority of vehicles in single- and two-vehicle accidents were going straight prior to the crash. The next most common vehicle maneuver differed by crash severity: negotiating a curve for fatal car accidents, turning left for injury crashes and stopped in traffic lane for property-damage-only crashes. [Based on 2003 data].

  • Fatal motorcycle accidents had the highest proportion of collisions with fixed objects (24.6 percent), and fatal bus accidents had the lowest proportion (2.1 percent). [Based on 2003 data].

  • The proportion of vehicles that rolled over in fatal automobile accidents (20.0 percent) was 4 times as high as the proportion in injury auto accidents (4.9 percent) and nearly 15 times as high as the proportion in property-damage-only car crashes (1.3 percent). [Based on 2003 data].

  • In the United States, an average of 6 children 0-14 years old were killed and 797 were injured every day in motor vehicle accidents during 2000. In the 0-14 year age group, males accounted for 56 percent of the fatalities and 51 percent of those injured in auto accidents during 2000.

  • In 2000, 20 percent of the children under 15 years old who were killed in motor vehicle crashes were killed in alcohol-related automobile accidents.

  • Of the children 0-14 years old who were killed in alcohol-related auto accidents during 2000, almost half (223) were passengers in vehicles with drivers who had been drinking, with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels of 0.01 gram per deciliter (g/dl) or higher.

  • Another 80 children under 15 years old who were killed in car accidents in 2000, were pedestrians or pedalcyclists who were struck by drunk drivers (BAC - 0.01 g/dl).

  • One-fifth (20 percent) of the traffic fatalities in the 0-14 year age group were pedestrians. [Based on 2000 data].

  • During 2000, 43 percent of the young pedestrian fatalities occurred the hours of 4 pm and 8 pm, and 81 percent occurred at non-intersection locations.

  • A total of 690 pedalcyclists were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2000. Children 0-14 years old accounted for 175 (25 percent) of those fatalities.

  • The majority of persons killed or injured in auto accidents in 2003 were drivers (64 percent), followed by passengers (30 percent), pedestrians (3 percent), motorcycle riders (2 percent), and pedalcyclists (2 percent).

  • Persons 16-20 years old had the highest fatality and injury rates in car accidents per 100,000 population. Children 5 to 9 years old had the lowest fatality rates, and children under 5 years old had the lowest injury rates. [Based on 2003 data].

  • For every age group involved in automobile accidents, the fatality rate per 100,000 population was lower for females than for males. The injury rate based on population was lower for females than for males for people 5 to 9 years old and over 74 years old. [Based on 2003 data].

  • Forty percent of the persons who were killed in car accidents in 2003 died in alcohol-related accidents. Ten percent of the injured persons received their injuries in alcohol-related crashes.

  • On average, a pedestrian is killed in a car accident every 111 minutes. [Based on 2000 data].

  • Most pedestrian fatalities in 2000 occurred in urban areas (71 percent), in normal weather conditions (91 percent), and at night (64 percent).

  • Pedestrian fatalities accounted for 85 percent of all non-occupant fatalities in 2000. The 690 pedalcyclist fatalities accounted for 12 percent, and the remaining 3 percent were skateboard riders, roller skaters, etc.

  • Nearly one-half (48 percent) of all pedestrian fatalities in 2000 occurred on Friday, Saturday or Sunday: 16 percent, 18 percent and 14 percent respectively.

  • According to the Insurance Institute For Highway Safety, 42,636 people died in car accidents in 2004.

  • Recent research (2005) conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) indicated drivers using cell phones are four times as likely to get into car accidents which are serious enough to result in injury, whether or not the phones are "hands free".

  • In every motorized country teenage drivers represent a major hazard. The problem is worse in the United States than elsewhere. Until the mid 1990s most U.S. states allowed teenagers to get full-privilege licenses at an earlier age than in most other countries, and little driving experience typically was required prior to licensure. The result was greatly elevated crash risk among young drivers. As more and more states have adopted graduated licensing systems, which phase in full driving privileges, the crash problem is expected to decrease. Teenagers drive less than all but the oldest people, but their numbers of crashes and crash deaths are disproportionately high. Based on crashes of all severities, the crash rate per mile driven for 16-19 years-olds is 4 times the risk for older drivers. Risk is highest at age 16. In fact, the crash rate per mile driven is twice as high for 16 year-olds as it is for 18-19 year-olds.
  • In Florida, there were 256,206 vehicle crashes including, Florida car accidents in the year 2007.
  • A total of 366,917 drivers were involved in Florida car accidents, truck accidents and motor cycle accidents in 2007.
  • In 2007, there were an average of 702 Florida vehicle accidents each day.
  • With so many tourists visiting from other states, Florida car accidents take a toll on more than just Florida families. Many Miami car accidents, for example, involve people from all over the world.

Crash rates for young drivers are high largely because of their immaturity combined with driving inexperience. The immaturity is apparent in young drivers' risky driving practices such as speeding and tailgating. At the same time, teenagers' lack of experience behind the wheel makes it difficult for them to recognize and respond to hazards. They get in trouble trying to handle unusual driving situations, even small emergencies, and these situations turn disastrous more often than when older people drive. Car accidents involving young drivers typically are single-vehicle accidents, primarily run-off-the-road crashes, that involve driver error and/or speeding. They often occur when other young people are in the vehicle with the young driver, so teenagers are disproportionately involved in crashes as passengers as well as drivers

*All auto accident statistics provided by NHTSA, FARS & NIIHS.

NHTSA TERMS

The experienced Miami car accident attorneys at Hannon Legal Group are available to discuss your potential case free of charge and with no obligation. Please feel free to email us or call us at (305) 358-3109